Tightening the ‘Stay-Set’ Chipbreaker




clifton_before_IMG_9332

Final week I took my new Clifton
No. 5 to show a full-size toolchest class at The Woodworkers Club in
Rockville, Md. A number of of the scholars used it on their
toolchests, which they made utilizing cherry, pine or poplar.

The airplane did fairly nicely – the iron stayed sharp by means of
planing up a complete case. As I discussed in my entry on this
airplane
last week
, my solely quibble was with the airplane’s “Keep-Set”
chipbreaker. The “Keep-Set” is a two-piece design that permits
you to retain a chipbreaker setting throughout freehand sharpening.


clifton_before_IMG_9332

The quibble was that the breaker shifted ahead and again
a number of thousandths of an inch. That’s irrelevant for many
jack-plane work, however for a smoothing airplane it may be necessary.

David
Charlesworth
(sure, regardless of experiences on the contrary, David
is alive and nicely) recommended a fast answer that I attempted
at the moment. Utilizing a small middle punch on the primary plate of the
breaker, I deformed its slot barely, tightening up the cap of
the breaker so it didn’t transfer an iota.


clifton_punch_complete_IMG_9336

It took three stable punches on both facet to attain the match I
needed. On one facet of the slot I went somewhat too far, so I
used a needle file to scale back the slot to the correct width. In
all, it took lower than 5 minutes of labor.

I additionally dug up one of many outdated Clifton “Keep-Set” breakers from
10 years in the past that was in my bin of spares. That breaker had
zero slop in its slot, so you need to examine your breaker earlier than
punching away.

Extra on this instrument as I break it in.

— Christopher Schwarz


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