On the Precision of Chisels




My first MDF template with arrows pointing to the errors.

My first MDF template with arrows pointing to the errors.

In the case of doing precision work that must be carried out
over and over, it’s simple to fall into the siren whine of
the router.

The router might be my least-favorite woodworking instrument. I
don’t like how it’s noisy. It by no means produces a ready-to-finish
floor for mouldings. And it may well destroy a workpiece sooner
than any energy instrument I’ve handled.

I attribute my dislike of this instrument to a private defect in my
head. I’ve seen authors and associates work wonders with this
instrument. For me, nearly each encounter is irritating. So it
may be a genetic drawback.

As we speak I attempted to get previous my dislike of the instrument and made some
loopy complicated templates for some brass pulls I’m putting in on
a teak marketing campaign chest. These pulls require recesses in two
completely different layers, and there isn’t a single proper angle.

So I fastidiously made a template from MDF, however I found I had
made a number of slicing errors. No drawback. I made one other
template from MDF. That one labored effective for the primary two
pattern cuts, however the MDF was too delicate. The bearing on my
sample bit compressed the MDF and the recess was too large for
the .

So I used Baltic birch plywood for the template. Certainly that
can be arduous sufficient.

It wasn’t. In two vital areas the birch compressed and left
a niche between the wooden and the .

I had began this course of at 11 a.m. At 5 p.m. I spotted I
had been fussing with these templates for six hours and didn’t
have a single pull put in.

I grabbed a chisel. And inside 20 minutes I had a pull
put in.

In case you love your router, then extra energy to you. I’ve – after
23 years of messing with them – realized that I’m not a router
man.

— Christopher Schwarz


A pull I installed with a chisel. There are some small gaps that can be fixed with splinters, glue and dust.

A pull I put in with a chisel. There are some small gaps
that may be fastened with splinters, glue and dirt.


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