A Quick Preview of the ‘Vampire Vise’



Vampire Vise

With solely six days earlier than Woodworking in
America
, I’m beginning to marvel if I’m going to get
the whole lot prepared for the large three-day woodworking geek-fest
just a few blocks away from my store.

Right this moment I’m placing the ending touches on one of many two
Roman-style workbenches I’ve constructed for Woodworking in
America. I’ll be presenting a seminar on the analysis and
reasoning behind these benches on Sunday morning. However I’ll
even have each benches within the Market so that you can examine
out.

The bench proven above is from 1505 and makes use of a typical Roman
undercarriage. What’s distinctive about this design is that it’s
the primary one I’ve discovered with a contemporary finish vise and face
vise.

Vampire Vise

The tip vise is especially ingenious. As a substitute of canines, the
vise pinches the work utilizing 4 steel tooth – two within the canine
and two which are hooked up to the picket screw. I name it the
“vampire vise.” Sure it marks the work – punctures it,
really. However little marks like this had been typical on early
furnishings, so it wouldn’t have been a lot of a priority on the
time. I’m in all probability going to make a pair “muzzles” for the
tooth for once I don’t wish to mark the work and once I don’t
wish to gash my hand.

Vampire Vise

I additionally must make the picket hub of the vise right into a sq.
so I can change the picket tommy bar with the more-original
blacksmith-made crank. However that’s going to have to attend till
after Woodworking in America.

Thanks exit to Lake Erie Toolworks
for making the wonderful picket screw. I used the usual
picket screw the corporate makes. And because of blacksmith Peter Ross
for making the steel bits.

Received to run. These picket vise nuts aren’t going to rasp
themselves.

— Christopher Schwarz



CATEGORIES
Chris Schwarz Blog, Schwarz on Workbenches, Woodworking Blogs

Christopher Schwarz

About Christopher Schwarz

Chris is a contributing editor to Widespread Woodworking
Journal and the writer at Misplaced Artwork Press. He is a
hand-tool fanatic (although he makes use of energy instruments, too).

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