2 Great Uses for a Saw’s ‘Nib’




nib_compass_IMG_5571

In the event you personal a noticed that has a “nib,” an ornamental
nipple-looking factor on the toe of your noticed, somebody will ask
you what it’s for.

One of the best reply is: It’s ornamental.

However that doesn’t cease woodworkers from developing with makes use of
for it. Listed below are two good ones.


nib_keeper_IMG_5573

1. As a spot to tie in your noticed’s “keeper.” After I journey
with handsaws that aren’t in a instrument chest I shield their
enamel with some form of picket guard. A few of these keepers
clip on. A few of them match with friction. One of the best ways I’ve
discovered to safe a keeper is to tie it to the noticed.

One string goes via the keeper and thru the noticed’s
tote. The opposite string goes via the keeper and behind the
nib. If the noticed doesn’t have a nib, the string tends to slide
off simply.

2. Use the nib as a makeshift compass. Carpenter Carl
Bilderback confirmed me this trick. You first drive a nail or
screw on the centerpoint of the arc or circle you want to
draw. Place the noticed’s nib in opposition to the nail or screw. Place a
pencil into the gullet of one of many enamel of the noticed.

With one hand push the pencil round. With the opposite hand
push the nib in opposition to the nail. After just a few trials you’ll get
the dangle of it.

I’ve tried among the much less ridiculous makes use of for the nib
(utilizing it to attain an edge to stop splintering, submitting it
right into a tooth for numerous causes), however these are the one two
makes use of that I truly would use.

— Christopher Schwarz

Need to be taught to sharpen your handsaws? Take a look at
this DVD
from Ron Herman. There are a lot of methods to sharpen
saws; I’ve discovered Herman’s strategies attraction to quite a lot of
newcomers. Test it out at
shopwoodworking.com
.



CATEGORIES
Chris Schwarz Blog, Saws, Woodworking Blogs

Christopher Schwarz

About Christopher Schwarz

Chris is a contributing editor to Widespread Woodworking
Journal and the writer at Misplaced Artwork Press. He is a
hand-tool fanatic (although he makes use of energy instruments, too).

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